Launch Team

Leadership is not so much about technique and methods as it is about opening the heart. Leadership is about inspiration—of oneself and of others. Great leadership is about human experiences, not processes. Leadership is not a formula or a program, it is a human activity that comes from the heart and considers the hearts of others. It is an attitude, not a routine.
— Lance Secretan

Here to serve, not be served

A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. They don’t set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of their actions and the integrity of their intent.
— Douglas MacArthur
 

Qualification For Leadership

Commitment. Are the would-be leaders clearly committed to Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord? Is there a passion to know him in all his fullness? While different personality types express passion differently, there must be evidence of a fire inside to know and obey the Crucified and Risen One.

Conviction. Do the would-be leaders have biblically informed convictions-about who God is, who humans are, the meaning of history, the nature of the church, and especially the meaning of Jesus' death and resurrection? Are they learning what it means to be transformed by the renewal of the mind (Rom. 12:2), to "think Christianly" about every dimension of their lives-money, time, sex, family, recreation? For this reason, Paul warns against being too quick to call recent converts to leadership; commitment and conviction take time to deepen.

Competency. Do the would-be leaders know how to make their way through the Scriptures? Can they help others find their way around the sacred pages (2 Tim. 2:15)? Have the would-be leaders been entrusted with appropriate gifts of the Holy Spirit (Eph. 4:11-12, 1 Cor. 12:12-31, Rom. 12:3-8)? Do they have a working understanding of the gifts, and can they help others discern and deploy those entrusted to them? Do they have the necessary relational skills for this position? Do their relationships manifest the integrity and love of Jesus, especially in their marriage and with their children (2 Tim. 3:5)? The Kingdom of God, after all, is about righteousness; that is, right relationship.

Character. Are the would-be leaders taking on the character of Jesus? Someone has astutely observed, "It is not a matter of perfection, but direction." Are the potential leaders moving toward greater and greater Christ-likeness? The lists of leadership requirements are finally about character. Do they exhibit self-control, hospitality, gentleness (control of anger), a quest for holiness, temperance? Is there evidence of dying to the love of money, to manipulation, to always having it one's own way? Are they faithful to their spouse?